Aug 28, 2017 - AP Literature    Comments Off on Short Story Bootcamp: Writing Prep

Short Story Bootcamp: Writing Prep

bootsWe’re in the home stretch of our short story boot camp, and now it’s time for you to put your knowledge to work. You will work with a partner to analyze a story from an assigned group. The ultimate objective is to write a joint paper about the story which uses specific examples from the selected text to answer an AP-style prompt.

Your partnership will complete the following tasks:

  • Read and discuss your story – you may mark your electronic copy either with notes/highlighting in Google Docs or through a PDF markup tool like DocHub or Kami
  • Select an AP prompt from a provided list
  • Collaborate to write a formal paper – both partners are responsible for every word in the draft and should discuss all decisions during the writing process

You and your partner should confer to select ONE story from your assigned group. You may access/download a copy of your story from the following links:

GROUP A

Ray Bradbury, “The Veldt

Gina Berriault, “The Stone Boy

Tillie Olson, “I Stand Here Ironing

Alice Walker, “Everyday Use

GROUP B

Sherman Alexie, “This Is What It Means to Say Phoenix, Arizona

William Faulkner, “A Rose for Emily

Frank O’Connor, “First Confession

Eudora Welty, “A Worn Path

GROUP C

Arthur C. Clarke, “The Nine Billion Names of God

Nadine Gordimer, “Once Upon a Time

Ursula K. LeGuin, “The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

Gabriel García Márquez, “The Handsomest Drowned Man in the World

 

 

In your partnership, you will first discuss and expand your knowledge and understanding of your selected story. Use the Literary Elements diagram to guide your analysis and discussion. Consider which of the tools are being employed in a way that reveals the author’s overall meaning in the story. For example, John Updike’s “A&P” is successful because of his choice of the first person point of view, which helps to create the indelible character of Sammy the checkout clerk. You can discuss strong characterization, the success of the use of dialogue, diction and syntax choices that reveal tone, how symbols in the story convey meaning—your choices are open. You could also refer to the Exploring and Identifying Theme handout to begin crafting a MOWAW for your story. Remember, a statement of meaning cannot be a single word; it must be expressed in a phrase.

Your discussion and analysis will be used to select a prompt for your final 500-word paper, which will be due this Friday. Prompts will be made available tomorrow.

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