Tagged with " Canterbury Tales"
Nov 17, 2014 - Honors IV    Comments Off on The Panther Pilgrimage

The Panther Pilgrimage

pilgrimsTo conclude our study of Chaucer and The Canterbury Tales, you will be working together to create a tale that instructs someone from the modern era on the consequences of one of the Seven Deadlies. Chaucer chose the entire scope of medieval society as his backdrop; we will be using the American high school.

Each group must select a character type found in a typical high school, such as jock, band geek, nerd, skater, etc., as its main character. Once your group has selected a character, you will randomly draw one of the Seven Deadly Sins as the focus of your tale. Each group will create the following:

Description of your pilgrim: You may include clothing, characteristics, physical traits, or whatever will communicate your character. Designate someone in your group to draw or collage your Pilgrim. Original art or images from the internet are both acceptable, but make it colorful!

Prologue to your tale: 10-20 lines introducing your character (you could include some description here) and the scenario that introduces your sin.

Your tale must meet the following requirements:

  • Describe a situation or problem created by your Deadly Sin
  • Tell a story about how your Pilgrim reacts to/confronts/is seduced by your Deadly Sin
  • Deliver a moral or lesson about that Deadly Sin
  • 2 pages minimum (double spaced)
  • Write in couplets!

Your final tale must be typed and submitted with your Pilgrim’s picture. Presentations will occur by random draw. All pictures and tales must be ready to present in class on Thursday, November 20.

Nov 5, 2014 - Honors IV    Comments Off on Mapping the Seven Deadly Sins

Mapping the Seven Deadly Sins

 

sinmaps

Now that we have completed our review of the Seven Deadly Sins and the Seven Heavenly Virtues in preparation for our study of Chaucer, it’s time to apply what we’ve learned to current events.  Consider the information about each sin and its corresponding virtue. Then review the map indicating the saintly vs. sinful areas of the country. After reviewing all the maps, your task is to write a short paper integrating the information from the presentation into your future life. Your paper should answer these questions:

1. Based on the information, which state/area of the country would you choose to establish your family? Give reasons why this area would be a good place to raise a family.

2. Based on the information, which state/area of the country would you avoid when selecting a place to settle down? Explain your reasoning, again by using specifics from the presentation and the maps.

You don’t necessarily have to choose a gold area–what benefit is there to raising children in an area that presents more of a challenge? Consider also how you might overcome the influence of a particular sin. Remember that gray areas on the map don’t mean the sin isn’t present; it just means that area has an average distribution of the sin compared to the country as a whole. Clickable maps that can be enlarged for detail may be found here.

Your completed paper, which may be handwritten (2 full pages) or typed (1 page), is due when you arrive in class Friday, November 7.

 

 

Nov 4, 2014 - Honors IV    Comments Off on The Seven Deadly Sins

The Seven Deadly Sins

In the fourth century, Greek monk and theologian Evagrius Ponticus first conceptualized the idea of eight offenses or “wicked human passions” having a negative effect on human behavior and relationships. Over the next several centuries, church leaders ranked and reworked this list into what we now know as the Seven Deadly Sins.

Pope Gregory ranked the Deadly Sins according to the degree in which they offended against the holy virtue of love. Pope Gregory’s order from worst to least is pride, envy, anger (wrath), sloth, avarice (greed), gluttony, and lust. Later theologians dismissed the idea of ranking the sins, as all of them were considered “deadly” to living a holy and fulfilled life.

Medieval understanding of the sins included not only the sin itself, but a corresponding punishment in Hell, ranging from being thrown in snake pits or submerged in freezing water to burning in fire and brimstone. Church teachings at the time also developed to include the idea that a corresponding Heavenly Virtue was necessary to overcome the grip of sin:

Pride – Humility
Envy – Kindness
Wrath – Patience
Sloth – Diligence
Avarice – Charity
Gluttony – Temperance
Lust – Chastity

Most of Chaucer’s Canterbury tales indicate ways in which a person is within the grip of one or more of the Deadly Sins, showing what lessons the characters may learn from their transgressions or hope to improve by application of one or more of the Virtues. In this way, the Canterbury Tales reflect the daily role of the church in medieval life.

Dec 9, 2013 - Honors IV    Comments Off on The Franklin’s Tale

The Franklin’s Tale

Lady_And_Knight

The medieval knight features prominently in several of the Canterbury tales, largely because of the position and honor expected of them. This tale focuses on what happens when something challenges the knight’s code of chivalry. A copy of the tale may be found here. A modern translation of the tale may be found here.

For your tale, you must complete the following:

–Identify the Deadly Sin and how the character(s) suffers from it
–Briefly summarize the action, keeping the sin in mind
–Explain what happens to cure the character of the sin and any results

Dec 9, 2013 - Honors IV    Comments Off on The Nun’s Priest’s Tale

The Nun’s Priest’s Tale

chanticleer and fox

The Nun’s Priest’s Tale is different from some of the others because of its use of animal characters to illustrate very human failings. The introduction to the tale and the tale itself may be found here. A modern translation of the Nun’s Priest’s Tale may be found here.

For your tale, you must complete the following:

–Identify the Deadly Sin and how the character(s) suffers from it
–Briefly summarize the action, keeping the sin in mind
–Explain what happens to cure the character of the sin and any results