Tag Archives: discussion

Lord of the Flies Seminar Questions

In preparation for our Socratic seminar on Lord of the Flies, please gather textual support that will help you answer the following questions. Although direct quotations are encouraged, references to specific plot elements, characters, etc. in the text will suffice. Remember that the ultimate goal of the seminar is to enhance your knowledge of the work itself, so focus your attention on what occurs in the text rather than speculation drawn from the events in the text.

1. Who was the most effective leader, Ralph or Jack?

2. Could the boys have avoided the fate predicted by the Lord of the Flies?

3. Are people truly good or evil? Was the Lord of the Flies correct?

4. Analyze the conversation between Simon and the Lord of the Flies.

5. Which of the main characters was the most important to the story?

6. Whose fault is it that children started dying on the island?

7. Explain how the book uses foreshadowing.

8. What is the beast, really? Who is most affected by it?

9. How does the importance of the conch change throughout the novel?

10. What are the boys facing when they return home?

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Wuthering Heights Seminar Threads

grangeTo prepare for our seminar this week, please gather specific textual evidence for the following threads. Try to “spread the wealth” among the threads instead of concentrating on one or two.

1. Narrator bias – Lockwood/Nelly Dean

2. Comparison of locations (inside/outside, different rooms, different places in different times, Wuthering Heights/Thrushcross Grange, home/moor, etc.)

3. Character weaknesses

4. Use of twos/pairs/opposites

5. Powerful symbols

6. Heathcliff—strong or weak? (You could look at any character regarding this)

7. Love/Passion/Revenge/Obsession

Image of Ponden Hall, believed to be the inspiration for Thrushcross Grange

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Using Verso

In order to participate in Verso discussions, you must be registered for your class group. Follow these steps to get connected:

  1. Download the Verso App through the Chrome Web Store (it is also available for mobile devices).
  2. Join your class using the code:
    Period 1 – WM5FVX
    Period 2 – 7UH1IS
    Period 4 – 4ZQ5E7
  3. Click on the activity and begin discussing. You must create a response before you can view and respond to your classmates.

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Sir Ken Robinson: Changing Education Paradigms

The following RSA Animate video illustrates the points that the speaker, Sir Ken Robinson, makes about our education traditions in this country and the long-term effects that have caused him to call for a new view of education. When you watch the following video, respond to these questions:

1.  What is the main problem that the presenter claims/proposes is an issue within America?

2.  What are two credible sources that the presenter uses to support his claims?

3.  What is one issue that you find that the presenter may be too ambiguous about?

4.  Does he offer a distinct and specific solution or does he just present the issue?

After completing the video and questions, reflect on the information. Respond in about a half-page. Consider where/when you agree with Sir Ken, how his ideas apply to your educational experience, and what you think we ought to do to address his points.

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Jane Eyre Seminar Questions

JaneIn preparation for our Socratic seminar on Jane Eyre, please gather textual support that will help you answer the following questions. Although direct quotations are encouraged, references to specific plot elements, characters, etc. in the text will suffice. Remember that the ultimate goal of the seminar is to enhance your knowledge of the work itself, so focus your attention on what occurs in the text rather than speculation drawn from the events in the text.

1. How does the relationship between Jane and Helen Burns affect her time at Lowood and Jane’s growth as a character?

2. Compare Jane’s independent nature with other female characters in the book (Aunt Reed, Helen Burns, Miss Temple, Mrs. Fairfax, Blanche Ingram, Diana and Mary Rivers, Rosamond Oliver).

3. What makes Jane fall in love with Edward Rochester? Why doesn’t she fall in love with her cousin, St. John Rivers?

4. Is Rochester a good match for Jane, given her experiences and lessons?

5. How does the first person viewpoint affect the development of the novel?

6. How do Rochester’s women (Bertha Mason, Cécile Varens, Blanche Ingram, Jane Eyre) reflect on his development as a character?

7. What critiques of society does Brontë seem to be making?

8. Which of Jane Eyre’s homes/residences had the most impact on the development of her character and her outlook on life?

9. Discuss the role of religion in the work.

10. How is the theme of appearance vs. reality manifest in the work?

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