Tagged with " sources"
Feb 26, 2019 - AP Literature    Comments Off on Key Scenes in Othello

Key Scenes in Othello

othello's lamentation

Consider/review these scenes as you complete your Major Works Data Sheet for Othello and prepare for the seminar:
Act I, Scene 3 – Othello and Desdemona’s stories of their love; The Duke’s and Brabantio’s warnings to Othello; Iago’s advice to Roderigo; Iago’s final speech
Act II, Scene 1 – Iago, Emilia, and Desdemona speaking of men and women; Iago’s speeches regarding his developing plan of revenge
Act II, Scene 3 – Cassio’s downfall and Iago’s advice to Cassio
Act III, Scene 3 – Iago plants and waters the seed of jealousy
Act III, Scene 4 – Othello confronts Desdemona about the handkerchief
Act IV, Scene 1 – Iago “proves” Cassio’s betrayal; Othello and Iago make plans
Act IV, Scene 3 – Desdemona and Emilia talk of men and women
Act V, Scene 1 – Iago puts his final plan into action
Act V, Scene 2 – Othello carries through with his part of the bargain; Iago’s plot is revealed and tragedy befalls the cast

Othello’s Lamentation by William Salter, 1857, from the Folger Library Collection

 

Dec 10, 2016 - College Basics    Comments Off on Problem-Solution Paper Guidelines

Problem-Solution Paper Guidelines

You will be writing a short problem-solution essay of your own which incorporates research material to define a problem of your choice, explore potential solutions, and lead to a conclusion in which you promote one selected solution as the most efficient choice.

STEP ONE: DEFINE THE PROBLEM
First, you must define, or draw a boundary around, the problem you will be exploring. “Environmental change” is too big, but “negative effects of overdevelopment” is more manageable. “Politics” is too broad, but “increasing voter participation” is clearer and easier to discuss. You may use some research material here to help define your problem, like statistics that reveal the decline in voter participation rates or quotations from policy experts on overbuilding in sensitive environmental areas. This section provides a frame of reference for the paper as a whole and should inform the reader about the aspect of the problem you wish to address.

STEP TWO: EXPLORE POTENTIAL SOLUTIONS
In this section of the paper, you will explain two or three potential solutions that should lessen the overall effects of the problem you identified. None of the problems you selected  can be solved by one simple solution (if they could be, we’d have fixed them already!). Instead, you will talk about some potential solutions that should mitigate, or lessen, the problem as a whole. For the voting problem, this might include a “motor voter” law that makes it easy for people to register to vote while they are renewing a driver’s license, making Election Day a national holiday so people are free to go to the polls, or changing our voting method to mail ballots or secure electronic voting. All of the solutions you suggest should include research information that explains why the solution is viable and what effect the selected solution can have or will have on the problem you have defined.

STEP THREE: SELECT THE BEST SOLUTION
Out of the solutions you have discussed, you need to choose one as the best solution to your problem. Note that this is not the only solution, but the one you think will have the strongest or most positive impact on your original problem. In this section of the paper, you will use your research to back up your conclusion. Explain why this choice is the best one. What effects has this solution had in other circumstances? Is this solution being implemented somewhere else in a positive way? What results have occurred?

Your finished paper should meet the following guidelines:

  • Typed, double-spaced, 12 pt. standard font
  • 2-3 pages of text
  • Research information should be cited internally using MLA format (quick guidelines here)
  • Works Cited page at the end in proper format listing the sources you have used in the paper

Your final paper should be uploaded to Google Classroom no later than Friday, December 16. Remember to revise and proofread before submitting!

Oct 17, 2014 - Honors IV    Comments Off on Argument Paper Source List

Argument Paper Source List

sources

Once you have completed your paper, you must include a list of the sources you cite within it. Any information you include that is new to you must be cited properly whether you paraphrase it or not! The sources you select should be listed on a separate, final page of your paper called the Works Cited page.

To format your Works Cited page, follow these instructions:

1. Title the page WORKS CITED (use all caps).

2. Double space the page.

3. List the sources you used in alphabetical order by last name. Although on future papers you will be expected to create proper citations, for this paper you may copy and paste from the list below.

4. Your list must be formatted with a hanging indent. The first line should be flush left with the margin. Each successive line should be indented one-half inch. If you use Word, select the entries and move the bottom triangle of the margin indicator over to the half-inch mark.

 

Dweck, Carol S.. “The Secret to Raising Smart Kids.” from Florida Collections Grade 12. 1st Ed. New York: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2014. 21-26. Print.

Gladwell, Malcolm. “Marita’s Bargain.” from Florida Collections Grade 12. 1st Ed. New York: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2014. 3-14. Print.

Gutierrez, R. N. “Why We Need Common Core: “I choose C.” Online video clip. YouTube. YouTube, 27 August 2012. Web. 1 Sept. 2014.

Lively, Penelope. “Next Term We’ll Mash You,” from Collections: Close Reader Grade 12. New York: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. 2014. 11-16. Print.

McRaven, Adm. William. “Admiral McRaven addresses the University of Texas at Austin Class of 2014.” Online video clip. YouTube. YouTube, 23 May. 2014. Web. 18 Sept. 2014.

Robinson, Sir Ken. “RSA Animate – Changing Education Paradigms.” Online video clip. YouTube. YouTube, 14 October. 2010. Web. 15 Sept. 2014.

Tough, Paul. “Kewauna’s Ambition” from How Children Succeed. Qtd. in Collections: Close Reader Grade 12. New York: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. 2014. 3-6. Print.

Wade, Lisa. “10 Things Every College Professor Hates.” Sociological Images. 26 Aug. 2014. Web. 4 Sept. 2014. <http://www.businessinsider.com/10-things-every-college-professor-hates-2014-8>.

REMEMBER: Your in-paper citations should include the last name of the author of your source. If it is a print source, the citation should include the last name and page number.

Oct 13, 2014 - Honors IV    Comments Off on Incorporating Sources: Argument Paper

Incorporating Sources: Argument Paper

Young woman behind booksAs you create the rough draft of your paper, you must incorporate source material from your notes. Any information you include that is new to you must be cited properly whether you paraphrase it or not! The instructions below will help you work with your source materials so you can include your research properly and avoid plagiarism.

PRINT SOURCES
Print sources require that you cite not only the author name but also the page number the information is found on. Here are some examples from a print article about the Titanic disaster.

ORIGINAL SOURCE
The Titanic had carried boats enough for 1,178 persons, only one-third of her capacity. Her sixteen boats and four collapsibles had saved but 711 persons; 400 people had needlessly lost their lives. (Hanson Baldwin, “R.M.S. Titanic,” from Readings for Writers, Ed. Jo Ray McCuen and Anthony C. Winkler, p. 355)

You must cite the source when you paraphrase information from the source:
Although Titanic had lifeboats, they would only hold one-third of her passengers. (Baldwin 355)

When you include a small portion or snippet of the original source, place the citation as close as possible to the quoted material:
Titanic’s lifeboats had space “enough for 1,178 persons,” (Baldwin 355) but most of them were left unfilled.

When quoting directly from the source, include quotation marks and list the citation at the end:
“Titanic had carried boats enough for 1,178 persons, only one-third of her capacity.” (Baldwin 355)

You may also include the name of the source in the sentence introducing the quotation, but you still need to cite the page number at the end:
According to Baldwin, “Titanic had carried boats enough for 1,178 persons, only one-third of her capacity.” (355)

Print sources for this paper include “Kewauna’s Ambition” and “Next Term We’ll Mash You” (Close Reader), and “Marita’s Bargain” and “How to Build a Smarter Student” in the textbook.

ONLINE SOURCES
Online sources vary in how they are to be cited. Since online sources have no page numbers, you will generally cite information by using the author’s name alone. Here is a sample from an online source with a listed author:
The full citation for this page reads:
Molony, Senan. “Lifeboats Extinguished Their Lights!” Encyclopedia Titanica. N.p., n.d. Web. 01 Nov. 2012. <http://www.encyclopedia titanica.org/titanic lifeboats-extinguished-their-lights.html>.

ORIGINAL SOURCE
Lifeboats from the Titanic extinguished their lights in order not to become attractive beacons for swimmers after the sinking.
They cut themselves off from sight, and the grim truth is that they thereby callously cut off the lives of their former shipmates.

Citation using quoted text:
People in the lifeboats were afraid their boats would be swamped by others in the water, so they “extinguished their lights in order not to become attractive beacons for swimmers.” (Molony)

Some websites, however, do not contain author names. Their citations work a bit differently. The following information was found online at http://www.rmstitanic.net/learning-center/history/timeline.html
The full citation for this page reads:
“Titanic Timeline.” Learning Center. RMS Titanic, Inc., n.d. Web. 01 Nov. 2012. <http://www.rmstitanic.net/learning- center/history/timeline.html>.

ORIGINAL SOURCE
April 15th, 1912, 12:45 am:
First lifeboat leaves the Ship with only 19 aboard, although it could carry 65.

How to cite the source using a paraphrase:
At 12:45 am, the first lifeboat left the ship carrying only 19 passengers, although its capacity was 65. (“Titanic Timeline”)

The “10 Things College Professors Hate” article came from an online source.

YOUTUBE VIDEOS
If you plan to use information from either the Sir Ken Robinson video or the graduation speech from Adm. McRaven, you will need to cite it using the following model:

Shimabukuro, Jake. “Ukulele Weeps by Jake Shimabukuro.” Online video clip. YouTube. YouTube, 22 Apr. 2006. Web. 9 Sept. 2010. [The difference in the two dates is that the first is the creation date of the clip, while the second is the date you accessed it.]

The citation itself would include the last name only:
Spending the day as a “sugar cookie,” with your uniform and body covered in wet sand, teaches you that nothing ever goes as planned, even when you think you’re prepared. (McRaven)

Transcripts of both of these videos are available online if you search for the title and author of the video and include the word transcript.

Nov 12, 2013 - Honors IV    Comments Off on Research Paper: Working with Sources

Research Paper: Working with Sources

As you create the rough draft of your paper, you must incorporate source material from your notes. Remember, any information you include that is new to you must be cited properly whether you paraphrase it or not! The instructions below will help you work with your source materials so you can include your research properly and avoid plagiarism.

PRINT SOURCES
Print sources require that you cite not only the author name but also the page number the information is found on. Here are some examples from a print article about the Titanic disaster.

ORIGINAL SOURCE
The Titanic had carried boats enough for 1,178 persons, only one-third of her capacity. Her sixteen boats and four collapsibles had saved but 711 persons; 400 people had needlessly lost their lives. (Hanson Baldwin, “R.M.S. Titanic,” from Readings for Writers, Ed. Jo Ray McCuen and Anthony C. Winkler, p. 355)

You must cite the source when you paraphrase information from the source:
Although Titanic had lifeboats, they would only hold one-third of her passengers. (Baldwin 355)

When you include a small portion or snippet of the original source, place the citation as close as possible to the quoted material:
Titanic’s lifeboats had space “enough for 1,178 persons,” (Baldwin 355) but most of them were left unfilled.

When quoting directly from the source, include quotation marks and list the citation at the end:
“Titanic had carried boats enough for 1,178 persons, only one-third of her capacity.” (Baldwin 355)

You may also include the name of the source in the sentence introducing the quotation, but you still need to cite the page number at the end:
According to Baldwin, “Titanic had carried boats enough for 1,178 persons, only one-third of her capacity.” (355)

ONLINE SOURCES
Online sources vary in how they are to be cited. Since online sources have no page numbers, you will generally cite information by using the author’s name alone. Here is a sample from an online source with a listed author:
The full citation for this page reads:
Molony, Senan. “Lifeboats Extinguished Their Lights!” Encyclopedia Titanica. N.p., n.d. Web. 01 Nov. 2012. <http://www.encyclopedia titanica.org/titanic lifeboats-extinguished-their-lights.html>.

ORIGINAL SOURCE
Lifeboats from the Titanic extinguished their lights in order not to become attractive beacons for swimmers after the sinking.
They cut themselves off from sight, and the grim truth is that they thereby callously cut off the lives of their former shipmates.

Citation using quoted text:
People in the lifeboats were afraid their boats would be swamped by others in the water, so they “extinguished their lights in order not to become attractive beacons for swimmers.” (Molony)

Some websites, however, do not contain author names. Their citations work a bit differently. The following information was found online at http://www.rmstitanic.net/learning-center/history/timeline.html
The full citation for this page reads:
“Titanic Timeline.” Learning Center. RMS Titanic, Inc., n.d. Web. 01 Nov. 2012. <http://www.rmstitanic.net/learning- center/history/timeline.html>.

ORIGINAL SOURCE
April 15th, 1912, 12:45 am:
First lifeboat leaves the Ship with only 19 aboard, although it could carry 65.

How to cite the source using a paraphrase:
At 12:45 am, the first lifeboat left the ship carrying only 19 passengers, although its capacity was 65. (“Titanic Timeline”)